Technical Desktops - Accessories


98x5 Computers Selection:

1) 1311A Analog Display (1971)
2) 1310A Analog Display (1971)
3) 1317A Analog Display (1974)
4) 3051 System ROM for 9815A (1975)
5) 98131A Printer Interface 9815 (1975)
6) 98134A Parallel Interface 9815 (1975)
7) 98132A Plotter Interface for 9815 (1975)
8) 98133A BCD Interface 9815 (1975)
9) 98135A HP-IB Interface 9815 (1975)
10) 98136A Serial Interface 9815 (1975)
11) 98033A BCD Interface for 98X5 (1976)
12) 9878A I/O Expander (1976)
13) 98034 HP-IB Interface (1976)
14) 98046B RS-232 Interface (1976)
15) 98210A String/Adv Prog ROM 9825 (1976)
16) 98211A Matrix ROM 9825 (1976)
17) 98212A Plotter/Gen I/O ROM 9825 (1976)
18) 98213A Gen I/O Ex I/O ROM 9825 (1976)
19) 98216A 9872 ROM for 9825 (1976)
20) 98217A 9885 ROM for 9825 (1976)
21) 1304A Analog Monitor (1976)
22) 98032A 16-bit Parallel Interface (1976)
23) 98214A Gen I/O Ext I/O Plotter ROM for 9825 (1976)
24) 98215A Gen I/O 9872 Plotter ROM for 9825 (1976)
25) 9845A ROMs (1977)
26) 98036A RS-232C Interface (1977)
27) 98130A 9872 Interface for 9815 (1977)
28) 98224A Sys Prog ROM for 9825 (1977)
29) 98035A Real Time Clock 98X5 (1977)
30) 9845 Printer Paper (1977)
31) 98218A Mass Storage ROM for 9831A (1977)
32) 98223A Plotter Matrix ROM for 9831A (1977)
33) 9835 ROMs (1978)
34) 98040A Incremental Plotter Interface (1978)
35) 98041A Disc Interface (1978)
36) 98228A 9885/9895 ROM for 9825 (1980)
37) 9845B/C ROMs (1980)
38) 98770A Color Monitor (1980)
39) 98029A Resource Mgmt Interface (1982)

 

Through the middle 1970s, HP had been very successful with its desktop technical computers. The handheld calculator "gold rush" that started in 1972 had been even more successful. Between 1975 and 1978, HP introduced five desktop machine families, from compact (9815) to bulky and powerful (9845). The 9845 was the first computer from HP to "look" like a modern PC, with a twelve inch CRT screen. The 9845 family had an astounding seven year life. The 9825 introduced a new language to HP computing (HPL). It was produced in large volumes and became the workhorse instrument controller from HP. In 1979, HP led the world in sales of desktop computers with 32 percent market share (IBM was second with 19 percent of the market).

HP shipped more than 85,000 of the 9825 and 9845 combined (Computer News: September 1, 1985).

These products were developed and manufactured at HP's Loveland Division and Fort Collins Division.

For more information on these products, be sure to sure to visit the Keyboard Magazine library.

The museum has an extensive collection of software available for download for these computers. Click here for the software listing.


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