Business Desktops/Calcs


Calculators Selection:

1) HP-35 (1972)
2) HP-80 (1973)
3) HP-46 (1973)
4) HP-81 (1973)
5) HP-45 (1973)
6) HP-65 (1974)
7) HP-70 (1974)
8) HP-55 (1975)
9) HP-21 (1975)
10) HP-22 (1975)
11) HP-25 (1975)
12) HP-25C (1976)
13) HP-27 (1976)
14) HP-67 (1976)
15) HP-91 (1976)
16) HP-97 (1976)
17) HP-29C (1977)
18) HP-92 (1977)
19) HP-01 (1977)
20) HP-10 (1977)
21) HP-19C (1977)
22) HP-31E (1978)
23) HP-32E (1978)
24) HP-37E (1978)
25) HP-38E (1978)
26) HP-33E (1978)
27) HP-34C (1979)
28) HP-97S (1979)
29) HP-41C (1979)
30) HP-11C (1981)
31) HP-12C (1981)
32) HP-10C (1982)
33) HP-15C (1982)
34) HP-16C (1982)
35) HP-18C (1986)
36) HP-28C (1987)
37) HP-14B (1988)
38) HP-17B (1988)
39) HP-19B (1988)
40) HP-22S (1988)
41) HP-27S (1988)
42) HP-32S (1988)
43) HP-42S (1988)
44) HP-20S (1989)
45) HP-21S (1989)
46) HP-10B (1989)
47) HP-48SX (1990)

 

The web's best resource on this category is at the outstanding site: http://www.hpmuseum.org.

Computer or Calculator? This was a very fuzzy question during HP's first 10 years in the "small" computer business. Beginning with the 9100, most of the early machines were called calculators by HP. This nomenclature was solely for the purpose of circumventing the cumbersome purchasing cycle for "computers" that most companies employed. Most computers were big, expensive and delicate. Firms buying "computers" used a much more extensive review process for acquisition than they used when acquiring "calculators". So, "calculators" were easier to sell. As a result, anything that could be remotely considered to be a calculator was called a calculator. Even the 9845 was sometimes referred to as a calculator. The definition used by the museum is "If it fits nicely into the glass calculator display case, then it's a calculator, unless it's a 46 or 81 (too big to fit but still a calculator) or a handheld computer (71, 75, 94 or LX handheld)."


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